World War II History: Los Angeles Examiner Publishes a Map in 1937 Predicting How Japan Could Attack America

On November 7, 1937, the Los Angeles Examiner published a prescient map predicting how Imperial Japan could attack the US during World War II.

Created by Howard A. Burke, the map imagined a Japanese attack on the US that closely predicted the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor four years later on December 7, 1941. Burke rightly noted that Japan’s first target would be Hawaii and the US fleet docked at Pearl Harbor.

“The first objective must be capture of Hawaii,” Burke notes on the map. “This would mean crippling or annihilating the U.S. fleet, giving Japan one of the world’s greatest naval bases — Pearl Harbor.”

After that attack, Burke then imagined that Japan would follow up the assault with a two-pronged naval and aerial strike from Hawaii against Los Angeles and San Francisco, with a simultaneous Japanese assault from Alaska working its way down the Pacific Northwest.

You can see Burke’s map below:

Japan

Read the Original Article at Business Insider

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4 thoughts on “World War II History: Los Angeles Examiner Publishes a Map in 1937 Predicting How Japan Could Attack America

  1. Reblogged this on Rifleman III Journal and commented:
    It was known in 1935, that Japan had ideas of attacking US possessions. In 1936, Japan went into Korea and China. The writing was on the wall, but the mentality was not to look at it or bring attention to it until the code Purple was broken. Then the top brass simply ignored everything. S-S-S-M-MART…

  2. Makes you wonder what the outcome may have been if the Japs had actually invaded Hawaii. They wouldn’t have necessarily needed to invade the U.S. proper; having the (then territory) of Hawaii under their control, it would have considerably complicated our efforts to mount a counter offensive.

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